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Sea Mist Park.

When the Basslink project went ahead a large number of trees and other vegetation was cleared to form the corridor for the pylons, and this required a re-vegetation offset to be established to compensate for the loss. A large property adjoining the Mullungdung State Forest was purchased for the purpose, it had been cleared and had seen several failed agricultural ventures before falling into a derelict and degraded state. Greening Australia was contracted to undertake the re-vegetation work and to monitor its progress over a number of years until Sea Mist Park is added to and becomes part of the Mullungdung forest.
Martin Potts of Greening Australia is the man behind what has turned out to be a very successful re-veg. project, he is monitoring a number of plots for growth rate, and Gouldiae and I are joining Martin on bird surveys to monitor the movement of birds from the adjacent old forest into the new vegetation. We’re happy to report that the bush birds have moved in with enthusiasm, fantails, thornbills, scrubwrens, whistlers, thrushes, honeyeaters etc. are in excellent numbers, and no doubt will be breeding in the thick cover provided by the developing young forest.
During a previous survey we recorded Painted Button Quail in several locations as well as lots of Stubble Quail in the grassy areas. On our recent visit it was good to see a number of emus that were obviously well and truly resident.

emu

The photo was taken hand held at very long range with the 200-500 zoom, in contrast to the day flying moth, the Golden Grass Carpet, Anachloris subochraria, (Geometridae, Larentiinae) where I had to back off for a considerable distance to achieve focus.

golden grass carpet

A pair of hunting kestrels were difficult targets against the light.

kestrel

And another phase of surveying is in the offing too for this great re-vegetation success story, yes, the moth light is heading down there soon, who knows what will come in to the light, maybe even a mythical Mullung….. :-)

Click to enlarge.

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