On a warm day…..

……the reptiles come out to play. When I walked down on to the creek to look for dragonflies I could hear frogs calling, the shallows were full of tadpoles too, a good sign. Then, a movement, a frog hunting Red-bellied Black Snake slid into the water and swam away with sinuous movements of its body and tail, reptile number one. Climbing over some fallen timber further downstream I noticed a water-skink basking.

water-skink

Then after having its portrait taken it was joined by another.

water-skinks

And then a third joined the party.

water-skinks

Approaching the vehicle prior to moving on, a scratching sound made me look to the side.

goanna

A big goanna, it took no further notice of me, being at a picnic ground it was obviously used to people and the food scraps they leave behind. Reptile number three.

goanna

Then on the way home I had to swerve to avoid a good sized Jacky Lizard, reptile number four. Certainly made a change from the insects I’d been photographing.
Click to enlarge.

Creatures in close up #2.

I’ve probably put up enough photos of hoverflies, but perhaps one more, this one was pictured trying to clean its eye, rather unsuccessfully, with a pollen coated leg.

hoverfly

One more native bee too, this one collecting pollen from Chocolate Lily flowers.

bee

Growing in amongst the lilies were sundews, this fly came to a sticky end.

sundew

I’ve been regularly visiting a rocky hillside in the foothills waiting for a rather special plant to flower. It will be some time yet, but there have been other subjects for the camera, small moths for example like this Philobota arabella, the larvae of which feed on leaf litter.

philobota

There is quite a bit of a sedge species growing on the rocky slope, and of course there are sedge moths, very small but quite striking like Glyphipterix cometophora.

glyphipterix

At the moment in the grasslands and hills craneflies are in numbers, taking the opportunity to start producing the next generation.

craneflies

Odonata are making an appearance, species seen include Yellow-striped Hunter, Wandering Percher, Common Flatwing, Common Bluetail, Blue Skimmer, and Blue-spotted Hawker, one of which landed in front of me some distance from water.

blue-spotted hawker

Click to enlarge.

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